Moooom, I’m Soooo Booooooored!

Save summer boredom with the Rock Detectives kits!

The Most Hated Word in Geology

Ok, so I’m sure that not everyone hates this word. But, I sure do. I see many kids get frustrated with the subject of rocks just because this word is confusing and teachers often use it without explaining how easy the word really is to understand.

What’s the word? The word is detrital. Its synonym, clastic, is a close second on my “words I hate list.” Number three on my list has nothing to do with geology.

Sedimentary Rocks

Sedimentary rocks are formed in rivers, lakes, oceans or deserts.

What Would You Do With A Limestone Rock?

Limestone is a fine-grained sedimentary rock that forms when calcium carbonate precipitates in a quiet ocean environment such as deep, calm water. You cannot see individual grains with the naked eye in a fine-grained rock. Limestone is often white, pink, red, gray or black. Fossils are common in limestone because the calm ocean allows the calcium carbonate to precipitate around a dead plant or animal part without significantly disturbing the specimen. There are many varieties of limestone.

Sedimentary Rocks

Sedimentary rocks are formed when sand, small pieces of rock, or mud are deposited as layers of sediment.

New Ask-a-Geologist Question: Rock Types

Question: What are the three big groups of rocks? Answer: The three basic rock types are Igneous, Metamorphic and Sedimentary.

Ask-a-Geologist: Rock Types

Question: What are the three big groups of rocks?

Today we are Sedimentary Sleuthing!

Teach your children about sedimentary rocks with this cool Sedimentary Sleuthing kit. Your kit comes complete with six cool sedimentary rock samples: lignite coal, sedimentary breccia, conglomerate, fossiliferous limestone, yellow sandstone and shale.

My Rockin’ Collection! Sedimentary Rocks

Kids will learn about some of the Earth’s most beautiful and interesting rocks in Mini Me Geology’s Sedimentary Rock collection.

A little about Sedimentary Rocks

Sedimentary rocks are formed when sand, small pieces of rock, or mud are deposited as layers of sediment. These layers of sediment are pressed together over a long period of time and form a sedimentary rock from the pressure and cementation process.